Is Canada Truly and Officially Bilingual?

French English
Bilingualism in Canada

 

 

Both French and English are official languages of Canada which “have equality of status and equal rights and privileges as to their usage in all institutions of the Parliament and Government of Canada,” according to Canada’s constitution.
However, Canada’s provinces and territories have adopted widely diverging policies regarding minority-language services. Given the wide range of services, ranging from policing, health care and education, that fall under provincial jurisdiction, these divergences have considerable importance.

Hopefully, I can simplify this by showing you how each province and territory work with this.

 

 

Alberta uses both English and French in Parliament/Legislature. Their laws and regulations are in English only. Their courts can be bilingual in oral submissions, but not in written form.

British Columbia uses only English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations are in English only, and their courts are in English only.

Manitoba uses both English and French in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

New Brunswick uses both English and French in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Newfoundland and Labrador use only English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Nova Scotia uses only English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Ontario uses both French and English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Prince Edward Island only uses English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Quebec uses both French and English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Saskatchewan uses both French and English in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Yukon uses both French and English, as well as Yukon aboriginal languages, in Parliament/Legislature, their laws and regulations and in their courts.

Northwest Territories uses both French and English, and any of the other nine official territorial languages, in Parliament/Legislature. A person can also use one of the other nine official languages for oral submissions in their courts. The other nine official languages are Chipewyan, Cree, Gwich’in, Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun, North Slavey, South Slavey and Tłı̨chǫ.

Nunavut uses both French and English, as we the Inuit language, in Parliament/Legislature, and their laws and regulations and are also the Inuit language in their courts.